Birthday: 20-04-1947
Age: 72
Star sign: Taurus

Ken Scott is an English recording engineer and producer, known for his works with popular bands, and artists such as The Beatles, Sir Elton John, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Pink Floyd, and many others. Scott, born in South London, trained under the careful tutelage of Norman Smith & Malcolm Addey, at the Abbey Road Studios. Although young Ken was only 16 years old, he was promoted to the position of 2nd Engineer in just half a year, where his first assignment involved working on The Beatles album titled "A Hard Day’s Night." The song "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" by Manfred Mann was Ken Scott's first number-one hit, and the sound was engineered by him. Peter & Gordon, Judy Garland, the Hollies, Peter Sellers were some of the artists that Scott worked alongside in sound mixing. Soon, Ken climbed the ranks of sound engineering with ease, as if he was born for it. Your Mother Should Know by the Beatles constituted Scott's first assignment as a head engineer, followed by Hey Jude, Hello Goodbye and Lady Madonna. In the year 1969, Ken Scott joined Trident Studios after parting ways with Abbey Road. At Trident,

Scott worked on solos featuring John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison, and Elton John's “Madman Across the Water,” I’m only the Piano Player, Honkey Chateau, and Don't Shoot Me. Subsequently, David Bowie and his protege Freddie Burretti, also co-produced albums such as "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust," Hunky Dory and Spiders from Mars. During Scott's tenure at the Trident, he collaborated with various artists such as Lou Reed, the Rolling Stones, Harry Nilsson, and Al Kooper. Ken Scott was hugely instrumental in bringing about a refreshing change in the genre of Jazz-Rock by working closely with the Mahavishnu Orchestra, Billy Cobham, Jeff Beck, and Stanley Clarke. In the year 2012, Scott co-wrote "Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust," a memoir along with Bobby Owsinski. In his professional career, Ken Scott has been presented with a Clio Award for his work in "I'd like To Buy the World a Coke," and was twice nominated for Grammy Awards for the Best Engineered Pop Album.

 

Another Version Bio...

 

Ken Scott is a British record engineer and record producer. He was the recording engineer for The Beatles along with four other main engineers. He has also engineered Elton John, The Jeff Black Group, Pink Floyd, etc. Ken was born on 20 April 1947 in London. From 27 January 1964, he started working at EMI Recording Studios. The studio was renamed to Abbey Road Studios later. When he joined the EMI Recording Studios, he was just 16 years old. He got training under veteran recording engineers like Norman Smith and Malcolm Addey. He was promoted to second engineer a.k.a button pusher only after working for six months in the studio.

The side two of A Hard Days Night (The Beatles album) was his first session. He was the second engineer for Manfred Mann’s Do Wah Diddy Diddy, Judy Garland, Peter and Gordon, Johnny Mathis, the Hollies, Peter Sellers, and Cliff Richard and the Shadows. In a while, he was promoted and given the work of cutting, which is now known as mastering. In 1967 September, he was promoted to an engineer. His first session was The Beatles’ song Your Mother Should Know. With The Beatles, Ken worked on their songs like Hello, Goodbye, Lady Madonna, Hey Jude, etc. he also worked on their Magical Mystery Tour albums and The Beatles (the White Album).

Few of the songs from these albums that Ken worked on are Helter Skelter, The Fool on the Hill, Birthday, Glass Onion, Back in the U.S.S.R., Not Guilty, and While My Guitar Gently Weeps. He also worked with other EMI artists like Pink Floyd, The Jeff Beck Group, Scaffold, the Pretty Things, and Mary Hopkin. His last assignment with EMI Studios was A Salty Dog, an album by Procol Harum. After that, Ken left EMI Studios for Trident Studios, an independent venture. He went there on the suggestion of Gus Dudgeon who was Elton John’s producer. He then worked for the solo albums of The Beatles. He worked on John Lennon’s Cold Turkey, and Give Peace a Chance.

He also worked on It Don’t Come Easy by Ringo Starr, and All Things Must Pass by George Harrison. He worked for Elton John, David Bowie, America, Rick Wakeman, Lou Reed, Harry Nilsson, Al Kooper, The Rolling Stones, and Lindisfame. He also worked on Coca-Cola ad song called I’d Like to Buy the World a Coke. Ken has received an award for his Coca-Cola ad at the Clio Awards. He also won two Grammy nominations in the category of the best-engineered pop album. The Association of Professional Recording Services presented him with a fellowship award in 2010.